TSB's

A Snappy Issue

This bulletin applies to a host of Chrysler models including 2001-2004 Sebring, 2002-2004 Jeep Liberty, 2003-2004 Dodge Neon, 2001-2004 PT Cruiser/Town & Country/Caravan/Voyager and 2003-2004 Jeep Wrangler, equipped with a 2.0L, 2.4L DOHC or 2.4L turbo engine.

A sound may be noticed when the engine is idling in park between idle rpm and 1,400 rpm at normal operating temperatures. The sound is on the upper end of the engine toward the front (passenger side) of the engine. The sound is described as a high pitched “snapping” sound. This is the result of improperly machined cam bearing caps during manufacturing.

The fix involves chamfering the bore radius on camshaft bearing caps L2 through L5 and R2 through R6.

1. Remove the cylinder head cover.

2. Remove the L2 cam bearing cap (left side, second cap from front).

3. Lightly chamfer the two bore radius edges with a small hand file, creating a 45-degree chamfer, 1.0 to 1.5 mm in width, along the edge of each bore radius. Be careful not to scratch the bearing surface.

4. Clean the cap to remove any filings.

5. Reinstall the L2 cap with bolts loosely installed. Prior to and during bolt tightening, twist the cap by hand in a clockwise direction, as viewed from the top. Torque both bolts to 105 in.-lbs.

6. Repeat steps 2 through 4 for cam bearing caps L3, L4, L5, R2, R3, R4, R5 and R6. Perform the complete operation one cap at a time. Do not remove all caps at the same time.

Cam caps are numbered for left and right sides, relative to the front of the engine. Do not perform the chamfering operation to the front cap (L1/R1 cap) or to the L6 cap.
<p>Cam caps are numbered for left and right sides, relative to the front of the engine. Do not perform the chamfering operation to the front cap (L1/R1 cap) or to the L6 cap.</p>

Use a small hand file to create a 45-degree chamfer, about 1.0 mm wide, along the bore radius on each side of the cap.
<p>Use a small hand file to create a 45-degree chamfer, about 1.0 mm wide, along the bore radius on each side of the cap.</p>

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